The Fundamentals of Strength Training

By November 30, 2017goals, Strength

The instagrams are clogged to bursting with videos of our friends at Cirque doing one-finger pirouettes and juggling kettlebells (Seriously. That’s a thing. Search #kettlebelljuggling or click this video of kettlebell juggling to see for yourself!).

But before you twinkle your toes—or your kettlebells—in the air, you’ve got to know the fundamentals of strength training. These are the building blocks upon which all other moves rest.

All those fancy flourishes can be boiled down into a few basic categories of human movement: Pull. Push. Lift. Lunge. Squat. Carry.

That’s why we’re dedicating this month at MGPT to the fundamentals of strength training. You’ll learn how to use the Olympic bar to do a real deadlift, squat, shoulder press, and benchpress. We’ll use kettlebells to do swings, carry and Turkish get up.

Why does this matter? What’s the use if you’ll never need to benchpress or swing in real life? A-HA! But you DO need to do this stuff in everyday life. Because every day life is comprised of pull, push, lift, lunge, squat and carry.

And unfortunately… this is the stuff where peeps get hurt because they haven’t trained the proper movement patterns.

You’re at a summer festival with a backpack-full of blankets and snacks and need to visit the port-o-potty (squat). Safely lift the bag of dog food from floor (deadlift). Push your car out of the snow (benchpress) and put away the box of old photos on the top bookshelf (shoulder press). Clear the walkway of snow drifts (swing) and transport baby & bucket from the parked car to the in-laws (carry). Last but certainly not least, you gotta know how to get up offa that dance floor without spilling a drop of martini (Turkish get up).

Practicing the fundamentals of strength training in a safe environment like MGPT Studio not only gets you stronger, it’s also injury prevention for everything life throws at you “out there”.

No one says it better than Bret Contreras, world reknown glute-strength expert (yes, this is also a thing). “If you think lifting weights is dangerous, try being weak. Being weak is dangerous”. 

If you have questions or want to learn more about the fundamentals of strength training, proper lifting technique and injury prevention, call me or drop in for a class.

Be healthy, Be happy,

Maxine

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